Monthly Archives: July 2011

“Volunteer County of the Volunteer State”

Check out this editorial on Unionist volunteers from Campbell County, TN.  Campbell Co. is just down the road from yours truly, and like the rest of East Tennessee, it was an anti-secession stronghold during the Civil War.  The editorial links the mountaineers’ patriotism with that of their Revolutionary ancestors, a comparison made by prominent Unionists in the 1800′s.

Leave a comment

Filed under American Revolution, Appalachian History, Civil War, History and Memory, Tennessee History

Was the Emancipation Proclamation a moderate measure or a radical one?

My answer to the above question is “yes.”  Obama recently used Lincoln’s proclamation as an example of effective compromise.  I think he might have overstated the case, since Lincoln acted pretty dramatically within the bounds of what he thought he could realistically do.  I explain this position in a post over at the Lincoln Institute blog.  Read it and feel free to disagree vehemently.

5 Comments

Filed under Abraham Lincoln, Civil War, History on the Web

Release Ye Olde Kraken

My favorite historical subject is, of course, America’s fight for independence, so I generally root for movies about the Revolutionary War.

Since I’ve been obsessed with dinosaurs, whales, giant squid, and other particularly large and fearsome creatures from the time I was a wee lad, I also generally root for movies about sea monsters.

I’ve yet to make up my mind about movies that combine the two.

Brian Helgeland has been hired to write “Here There Be Monsters,” a movie about Revolutionary War naval hero John Paul Jones — except with sea monsters, individuals close to the project confirmed.

Producers of the Warner Bros./Legendary project are in talks with Robert Zemeckis to direct.

“Here There Be Monsters” is based on an concept by Legendary Pictures CEO Thomas Tull.

Tull is producing along with Legendary’s Jon Jashni and Mandeville’s Todd Lieberman and David Hoberman.

Helgeland, who won the Academy Award for 1997′s “L.A. Confidential,” also wrote the 2003 “Mystic River,” the 2010 “Green Zone” and 2010′s “Robin Hood.”

Zemeckis directed a string of 1980s hits, including “Romancing the Stone,” “Back to the Future” and “Who Framed Roger Rabbit,” as well as 1994′s “Forrest Gump.”

This is one of those occasions when I can sympathize with the Apostle Paul, torn as he was between his two natures.  The mature, academic part of me that went to grad school is really, really nervous.  The behemoth-loving part of me that squeals with delight when I watch the Kraken sequences from Clash of the Titans is thinking this could be one of the Best. Things. Ever.

Don’t settle for the 2010 remake, by the way.  The only true Clash of the Titans is the 1981 Clash of the Titans.

3 Comments

Filed under American Revolution, History and Memory

The Atlantic slave trade

Ruining everybody’s fun for five hundred years.

1 Comment

Filed under History and Memory

Want to own a home with a Lincoln connection?

If you do, then head down to King George, VA tomorrow.  They’ll be auctioning off a farm where Booth and Herold came calling.

And if you need some extra funds to help close the deal, try looking behind your wall paneling.  You never know what might be back there.

Leave a comment

Filed under Abraham Lincoln, Civil War

He thought his life was done

…until Past in the Present gave him the hope he needed to carry on.

A spammer left this in response to the post about the Oneida Indians movie:

I want to express my thanks to you just for rescuing me from this type of instance. Right after looking out throughout the the web and meeting strategies that were not productive, I thought my life was done. Existing devoid of the strategies to the difficulties you have solved all through your good website is a crucial case, as well as the kind which may have negatively affected my entire career if I hadn’t come across your blog post. Your good expertise and kindness in playing with a lot of stuff was precious. I don’t know what I would’ve done if I hadn’t come across such a stuff like this. It’s possible to now relish my future. Thank you so much for the skilled and sensible guide. I won’t hesitate to suggest your web blog to anybody who desires assistance about this situation.

My friend, you’re quite welcome.  It’s long been my hope that my blog would allow readers who were at the end of their rope to meet strategies that are productive.  I’m glad I was able to prolong your life and avert any negative impact your career might have suffered in the absence of strategies to any relevant difficulties, the lack of which is indeed a crucial case.  I will endeavor to continue playing with a lot of stuff kindly and exhibiting my good expertise, and to do these things in a precious manner.  I hope you enjoy relishing the future which, in my small way, I’ve helped make possible.

Granted, I have no idea what this has to do with a movie about Oneida Indians in the Revolutionary War, but still.  As the Talmud says, “And whoever saves a life, it is considered as if he saved an entire world.”  That’s what I’m doing here, folks.  Saving the world, one spammer at a time.

Leave a comment

Filed under History on the Web

Thomas DiLorenzo takes issue with somebody. . .but who, exactly?

That’s the question I ponder at a new piece I’ve written for the Abraham Lincoln Institute blog.  See what you think, and feel free to add your comments over at that site.

I’ve enjoyed having the opportunity to pitch in over at the Institute blog, both as a contributor and editor.  Let me take this opportunity to ask that you make it one of your regular online stops if you’re a history blog reader, and to add it to your blogroll if you’re a history blog writer.  In the near future we’ll be posting some interviews with Lincoln scholars and other material of interest, so check it out.

1 Comment

Filed under Abraham Lincoln, Historiography, History and Memory, History on the Web