Tennessee’s newest state park has a John Sevier connection

The Tennessean reports that “the state park at Rocky Fork will showcase the frontier battle in which John Sevier, the future governor of Tennessee, led his troops against a large band of Cherokee Indians.”

A little more precision would be helpful here, since “the frontier battle in which John Sevier, the future governor of Tennessee, led his troops against a large band of Cherokee Indians” is about as specific as “that time Lindsay Lohan ran into trouble with the law.”  I’m assuming it’s the Battle of Flint Creek (Jan. 1789), but I could be mistaken.

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Filed under Appalachian History, Tennessee History

2 responses to “Tennessee’s newest state park has a John Sevier connection

  1. Yes, “35 Battles–35 Victories” and you’d think the media would be a bit more specific about which one Sevier fought in at Rocky Fork. Sigh.

    I believe you are correct about the Battle of Flint Creek. It’s interesting to me that in Sevier’s official report on the battle he buried 145 Creeks and Cherokees while Sevier’s men suffered very little loss of life. He noted “Our loss is very inconsiderable; it consists of five dead, and 16 wounded; amongst the latter is the brave Gen. M’Carter, who, while taking off the scalp of an Indian, was tomahawked by another whom he afterward killed with his own hand. I am in hopes this brave and good man will survive… We suffer most for the want of whiskey.”

    Much is made of the “savages” of the frontier in many of the secondary sources and literature about this era, but savagery existed on both sides and is not often discussed. I’m hopeful that the new Rocky Fork State Park education center will show all sides of this bloody conflict.

    • I agree with you in that we need to educate the people about what really happened on that cold winter day on Flint Creek. Its sad to think that the Franklinites had to kill 145 men but I’m sure it was just a matter of time before John Watts and his warriors were going to cause havoc in the Rocky Fork and surrounding area.

      I visit the battlefield very often and think back to what may have transpired that day. There are large mounds on both ends of the battlefield and I’m sure that’s where they buried the 145 Cherokees and 6 Franklinites.

      Such a beautiful place to visit, I get over there about once a month if I’m lucky.

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