‘Deep Throat’ parking garage is a goner

Usually you hear about a historic site disappearing because somebody is building a parking area.  This time a historic structure is disappearing because somebody is demolishing a parking area.

One of the most historic U.S. journalism sites will vanish after a Virginia county board voted to demolish the building and parking garage central to the Watergate political scandal of the 1970s.

The Arlington County Board agreed on Saturday to raze the Rosslyn garage where FBI official Mark Felt secretly met with Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward during the Watergate scandal. The investigation led to President Richard Nixon’s resignation in 1974.

Felt was known for decades as Woodward’s source “Deep Throat.”

Kind of seems like a shame, but at least there’ll be a marker at the spot.

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Glenn, Hillary, and history: pot, meet kettle

I can understand why the folks at Glenn Beck’s news outlet would get a kick out of Hillary’s Lincoln mistake.  But the admonition against removing a speck from your neighbor‘s eye seems awfully appropriate here.

 

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Hillary Clinton invokes ‘Team of Rivals,’ flubs a detail

Hillary Clinton was speaking in Chicago yesterday, and this happened:

A senator from Illinois named Lincoln?  There might’ve been, if a guy named Stephen Douglas hadn’t gotten in the way.  Lincoln served a term in the House of Representatives, but not the Senate.

I never know how much to make of it when politicians trip over history like this.  When it’s something said in passing, it’s hard to tell if the person just misspoke, or if it’s really a case where an eminent public figure genuinely has no idea what they’re talking about.

To me, the really interesting thing here isn’t the flub about Lincoln, but the way Clinton has assimilated the whole Team of Rivals thing into her personal history, with herself cast in Seward’s role as the frontrunner who becomes a member of the victor’s cabinet.  It shows you how deeply Doris Kearns Goodwin’s book has penetrated into the way American political leaders remember and make use of history.

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An American Revolution miniseries is coming

Titled Sons of Liberty, it’s about the movers and shakers of the colonial protest movement and will evidently cover the period from about 1773 to 1776.  The executive producer has done some documentary miniseries for The History Channel, but I assume this will be a dramatic work along the lines of Hatfields & McCoys.

Focusing on the Adamses and other well-known Whigs will mean inevitable comparisons with HBO’s John Adams miniseries, and HBO set the bar very high indeed.  We’ll see how SoL measures up.

I’m looking forward to seeing what they do with the subject matter, but as I said back in April, what I’d really love to see is a Southern Campaign miniseries.

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A few links to commemorate D-Day

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100 Civil War websites

MilitaryOnlineColleges.org has created a pretty handy list of 100 Civil War websites. It’s aimed at military personnel, but anybody interested in the Civil War should find plenty of useful stuff listed—databases, blogs (including this one), CWRTs, museums, and so on.  Definitely worth checking out.

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We’ve got a Bunker Hill winner

The deadline for entering our second Bunker Hill giveaway was Saturday night, but I didn’t get around to generating a random number and notifying the winner until a few minutes ago.  Sorry about the delay, guys, but I’ve been moving this week, so things have been pretty hectic.

Anyway, the winning number was 1,321.  Thanks to everybody who entered, and to all you fine folks who read the blog.

Oh, and don’t forget that I’m tweeting now, so follow me @mlynch5396.  I’m like the Swamp Fox of Twitter—my band of followers is small, but plucky and enterprising.

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