Another ginormous dinosaur from Argentina

We’ve got a new contender for biggest dino:

A team of scientists in Argentina have unearthed the remains of the largest species of dinosaur discovered to date, paleontologists announced Saturday.

Seven “huge” herbivorous dinosaurs were discovered at one site in the province of Chubut, Argentina, according to the Paleontological Museum Egidio Feruglio, which led the dig.

The new species are estimated to have been 40 meters in length and 80 tons in weight, surpassing the previous record-holder for the world’s largest dinosaur — the Argentinosaurus.

These dinosaur size rankings always come with a few caveats. Back in the 1870s, a fossil collector working for the famous naturalist Edward Drinker Cope found part of a backbone and femur from a long-necked dino that Cope named Amphicoelias fragillimus.  Comparing Cope’s report of the remains’ size to the same parts from better-known dinos indicates that A. fragillimus was far and away the longest dinosaur of all time—as in close to 200 feet from tip to tip.  The problem is, Cope’s published account is all we have, because the bones themselves are gone.  It’s possible they were in such a poor state of preservation that they just crumbled to pieces.

And a reported dino from India named Bruhathkayosaurus supposedly approached Amphicoelias in size, but the initial description was iffy and the specimen got washed away in a flood.

Anyway, this latest find means yet another humungous dinosaur from Argentina, a country with a track record of producing some of the biggest of all terrible lizards.  In addition to Argentinosaurus, it was also home to Giganotosaurus, one of the biggest carnivorous dinos.  We’ll be seeing him again in the very near future.  (Here on the blog, I mean, not out in the real world.  That would either be really, really awesome or really, really unfortunate.)

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The ramparts we watched

It’s the bicentennial year of the Battle of Fort McHenry, and a few days ago I managed to do something the British couldn’t: take the fort by water.  I was in Baltimore for a few days, so I hopped on a Water Taxi to visit the birthplace of the national anthem.

I was very impressed by the exhibit in the visitor center. The NPS always does a fantastic job at interpretation, but the set-up at Ft. McHenry is especially good, a model of clarity and conciseness that covers the background to the War of 1812, the British attack on Baltimore, Francis Scott Key’s song, and the process by which his words became part of the American canon.  All that in a pretty small gallery space.

There’s also an immersive film presentation that tells the story of the battle, with a simple but nifty trick at the end that takes you out of the virtual environment of the theater to put the spotlight back on the historic ground and why it matters.  It’s very moving and pretty darned cool.

I’m assuming we all know the basic story here, so we’ll skip the exposition and get right to the pictures.  Here are the fort walls, with the flag flying overhead.  (Well, not the flag, but a flag.)

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A reconstructed battery.

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Inside the walls, some of the buildings have been furnished as they would have been in the nineteenth century, while others serve as galleries for additional exhibits.

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One of those bombs bursting in air we keep hearing so much about.

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Powder magazine.  Not the best place for a smoke break.

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Sleeping quarters.

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During an archaeological dig in the 1950s, workers uncovered the actual cross brace which anchored the flagpole for the original Star-Spangled Banner.  It’s on display in one of the buildings.

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Looking out toward the area from which the British attacked.

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Ft. McHenry was in use for a long time after the War of 1812 ended, so some of the features you see date from well after the famous defense against the British, like this massive piece of artillery.

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There were quite a few school groups there during my visit.  Here’s an interpreter leading some kids through a hands-on activity on the parade ground.

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Funny story:  One of the rooms inside the fort has a short movie with a map presentation of the campaign.  Right after I sat down to watch it, a couple of kids came in.  When the film ended with the British in retreat and the Americans still in possession of the city, one patriotic little guy behind me jumped up and exclaimed, “YESSSS!”  Good to know the place and the story are still capable of instilling some good old-fashioned American pride.

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Ladies and gentlemen, meet the resident cats of Marble Springs State Historic Site

This hard-working trio is on duty 24/7 at the home of Tennessee’s first governor.

Cinnamon…

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Boots…

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…and John Sevier.

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Follow them on Twitter, or stop by the site and pay ‘em a visit.

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Win a Bunker Hill book

Last year the fine folks who published Nathaniel Philbrick’s Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution allowed me to host a giveaway.  Now that it’s out in paperback, we’re going to do another round, so if you want to win a copy, here’s what you do.

Pick any number between 1 and 1,776.  E-mail it to me at mlynch5396@hotmail.com, using “Bunker Hill Giveaway” as the subject line.  Deadline for entries is 11:59 P.M. on Saturday, May 31.  I’ll use the magic of the Interwebs to generate a random number, and the book goes to the person who selected the number closest to it.

Good luck, folks!

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In a new video, Boko Haram declares war on Abraham Lincoln

Should we tell this guy he’s a little late?

Word of advice, dude: Lincoln has dealt with rebel militants before.  Might want to reconsider.

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New space for old bones

This is bittersweet news for me.  The dinosaur hall at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History is closed for five years to make way for a total renovation.

I love the Smithsonian’s dino gallery.  It was the first major fossil exhibit I ever saw (so long ago that some of the occupants were probably breathing at the time).  There aren’t many museum experiences that could excite me more than walking through the NMNH rotunda, past that big bull elephant, and stepping into that massive hall dominated by a Diplodocus.

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What I loved almost as much as the skeletons were the dioramas in the rear of the gallery.  They were like little windows into a world I usually had to imagine.  I doubt they’ll survive the renovation, since they’re pretty outdated.  But to tell you the truth, once I got older I loved the fact that they were showing their age, because they took me back to the dinosaur books I read when I was a kid—books with dinos that hadn’t yet caught up with science, still lumbering around in swampy forests with their tails dragging behind them.

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The new exhibit should be pretty awesome.  They’re mounting a new T. rex, which I guess will replace the cast of “Stan” from the old hall.  Until then, Washington, D.C. is going to be a lot less awesome.  I really wish I could’ve visited this year, just to walk through one last time.

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Turns and twists

Here’s a heads-up for Turn viewers who are a few episodes behind–this post contains spoilers. Ye be warned.

Gen. Charles Lee’s capture is one of the most dramatic and humorous episodes of the American Revolution.  Lee was one of the war’s most colorful figures, an eccentric and unkempt British veteran who was habitually accompanied by a pack of pet dogs.  On the eve of the war he hung up his red coat and adopted America as his home country, fired with a commitment to Whiggish principles.  Lee’s experience got him a commission in the Continental Army, where (like his fellow expatriate Horatio Gates) he became one of Washington’s critics.

Despite his commander-in-chief’s entreaties, Lee dithered while the rest of the army retreated across New Jersey and into Pennsylvania in 1776.  On December 12 he stopped for the night at a tavern in Basking Ridge, NJ. British dragoons found him there the next morning, still undressed and several miles from the safety of his troops. Women inside the tavern offered to hide him, but Lee gave himself up when the British threatened to set fire to the building. (Incidentally, one of the dragoons who captured him was Banastre Tarleton, who went on to make a name for himself in the Southern Campaign.)  The troublesome general spent the next sixteen months in captivity, offering advice to the British on how to defeat his former compatriots.

Last week’s episode of Turn depicted Lee’s capture, but changed the circumstances.  The show has Lee falling into the hands of John André while playing hide-and-seek with a young woman who, unknown to him, is a British operative.

It’s an amusing scene.  But it’s no more amusing than the actual circumstances of Lee’s capture.  Why the change to the historical record?

I don’t have a problem with dramatic license. People who adapt history have to compress events, get inside the characters’ heads, and combine historic figures into composites. I get that.

If the story is told well, I can forgive all manner of distortions. I liked 300. I liked The Patriot, for crying out loud. In fact, the grand scheme of things, The Patriot‘s distortions are much more substantial than the liberties Turn took with Lee’s capture, but they don’t irk me as much because I can see the rationale behind them. Modern audiences wouldn’t be comfortable with a slaveowner protagonist, so you make his field hands free men. People want the villain to get what’s coming to him, so instead of having Tarleton/Tavington escape from the field at Cowpens, you have Mel Gibson shove a bayonet in his throat. I get that.

What I don’t get are these little departures that don’t really amount to any improvement over what actually happened. Would a straightforward depiction of Lee’s capture in his nightgown at a Basking Ridge tavern have been any less entertaining than the “Marco Polo” scene? I don’t think so. Nor do I think the notion of Lee passing information to the British before his capture adds anything in terms of entertainment value.

I don’t really intend this to be a criticism of the show. I’ve been enjoying it; in fact, it’s getting better with each episode, especially now that major players like Washington and Cornwallis are putting in appearances. I just get puzzled and irritated when filmmakers sacrifice accuracy for no apparent payoff.

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