Tag Archives: Andrew Johnson

Old slogans

A Chinese guy who ordered a t-shirt with a Patrick Henry quote on it is appealing his sentence of two years in a labor camp.  When you live in America, it’s easy to forget that in some parts of the world those 250-year-old words are still…well, revolutionary.

On a much lighter note, there’s a pretty clever Lincoln-Johnson campaign site you guys should see.  Oh, and some new John Bell Hood documents are coming to light.

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Filed under Abraham Lincoln, American Revolution, Civil War, History and Memory

Reconsidering Andrew Johnson

Dr. Paul Bergeron probably knows more about Andrew Johnson than anyone else does, so his newest book ought to be well worth a read.  Check out this article on Bergeron’s work in the Knoxville News Sentinel.

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Filed under Civil War, Historiography, Tennessee History

Hess on Lincoln Memorial University and Bergeron on Andrew Johnson

Let me direct your attention to two of this year’s books from the University of Tennessee Press, both of which I’ve eagerly awaited for some time.

First up is Lincoln Memorial University and the Shaping of Appalachia by Earl Hess, which will place the early history of LMU within the context of what was happening in Appalachia during the crucial late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and of the Lincoln apotheosis that peaked around the time of the centennial of his birth.

As regulars of the blog know, LMU is my alma mater, and Dr. Hess is one of the people most responsible for setting me on a path toward a career in history.  Most readers know him for his acclaimed Civil War studies.

Another book to anticipate is Andrew Johnson’s Civil War and Reconstruction by Paul Bergeron, who spent more than a decade editing and publishing Johnson’s papers and is probably the country’s foremost authority on him.  This book promises a more nuanced and balanced appraisal of Johnson than what many histories provide, and may lead to a thorough reassessment of his place in American politics.

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Filed under Appalachian History, Civil War, Historiography, Tennessee History

Lincoln at Tusculum

If you still haven’t gotten your Lincoln Bicentennial fix, you’ve got two more chances this fall with a couple of interesting events at Tusculum College in Greeneville, TN.

Tusculum itself has a pretty interesting history.  It’s the oldest college in Tennessee, and one of the oldest in the country.  Andrew Johnson was a trustee, and one of the school’s museums has a fine collection of Johnson material.  The other is devoted to the Doak family, whose members founded a couple of the schools that were Tusculum’s forerunners.  (Rev War buffs might recognize the elder Samuel Doak as the guy who gave the sermon at Sycamore Shoals in late September 1780, when the overmountain men mustered for the expedition that ended at King’s Mountain.)

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Filed under Abraham Lincoln, Tennessee History