Tag Archives: Dallas

Fifty years since Dealey Plaza

Twentieth-century American history has never been my thing, but I’ll admit that the flurry of assassination anniversary coverage over the past couple of weeks has piqued my interest.

I’ve never put much stock in conspiracy theories, and what I’ve read of the events in Dallas has only reinforced my conviction that Kennedy’s death was the work of one man. Most Americans disagree, although belief in a conspiracy seems to be declining. I was curious to see what my students’ opinions were, so on Wednesday I conducted an informal poll in one of my classes. Out of about twenty people, only three believed Oswald carried out the assassination himself. The rest thought there was some sort of conspiracy, except for two or three students who abstained because they weren’t sure one way or the other.

Of course, this week marks the sesquicentennial of the Gettysburg Address, too. Bill Mauldin tied Lincolnian imagery to JFK’s death in a famous 1963 cartoon, but I’m not aware of any major attempts to connect this year’s dual anniversaries. That’s a little surprising to me, given that both presidents met the same fate.

Anyway, here are a few links I found interesting.

  • Three hours’ worth of original CBS coverage from 11/22/63
  • Access plenty of primary source material via the Mary Ferrell Foundation
  • The house where Oswald’s family stayed is now a museum operated by the city of Irving, TX
  • Fascinating interviews with Oswald’s brother, older daughter, and younger daughter
  • An interactive timeline of JFK’s Dallas trip
  • A list of things Oliver Stone’s movie got wrong
  • Explore the collections at the Sixth Floor Museum, the National Archives, and the JFK Presidential Library and Museum
  • Take a virtual trip to Dealey Plaza, or view the scene from the webcam in the sixth floor of the former Texas Schoolbook Depository
  • Finally, Oswald’s wedding ring fetched $108,000 at auction last month. Accompanying the ring was a note from his widow, reading in part, “At this time of my life I don’t wish to have Lee’s ring in my possession because symbolicly [sic] I want to let go of my past that is connecting with November 22, 1963.” Since she’s spent five decades with the memory of that day—on which she found herself in a strange country, a frightened young mother of two children, and married to an abusive man who had just been accused of the crime of the century—I think she deserves some peace and quiet.

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Filed under History and Memory