Tag Archives: Tennessee historic sites

Statehood Days this weekend at Marble Springs

If you’re in the Knoxville area and you’re looking for something to do this weekend, stop by Marble Springs State Historic Site for Statehood Days.  They’ll have living history demonstrations, food, and tours of the historic buildings.  Here’s the schedule.

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Filed under Appalachian History, Museums and Historic Sites, Tennessee History

Ladies and gentlemen, meet the resident cats of Marble Springs State Historic Site

This hard-working trio is on duty 24/7 at the home of Tennessee’s first governor.

Cinnamon…

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Boots…

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…and John Sevier.

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Follow them on Twitter, or stop by the site and pay ‘em a visit.

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Filed under Museums and Historic Sites, Tennessee History

Close to home

I got a real shock when I read a new post  over at the fantastic Posterity Project blog today.  The Tennessee Preservation Trust has released its list of the state’s most endangered sites, and one of them is the Graham-Kivette House in Tazewell.  This ca. 1810 home is by far the oldest house in the area, and it’s just a stone’s throw from the house where I grew up.

In fact, I have some vivid personal memories of the place.  I think its last owner was John Kivette, who was Claiborne County’s historian and a good friend of my dad’s.  When I was a kid I used to sit in one of the house’s downstairs rooms, underneath one of those massive fireplace mantels, while the two of them pored over archival material and chatted about local history and the Civil War.  I’ve driven past the house thousands of times since then.  I’ll probably be doing so again tonight.

Whenever these “most threatened” lists come out I always read them with a sort of vague, general concern.  When it’s a place you know firsthand, it’s more like a punch to the stomach.  I knew the house was a significant local landmark, but I had no idea I’d ever see it on a statewide list, or that it was in such precarious shape.

I’ve always said that all history is “local history” for somebody.  It turns out “somebody” includes me, too.

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Filed under Historic Preservation, Museums and Historic Sites, Tennessee History