Tag Archives: War of 1812

Tidbits

Sorry for the absence, folks.  I’ve been pretty busy with classes, so we’ve got some catching up to do.  Here are a few items to amuse and inform:

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Filed under American Revolution, Historic Preservation, Museums and Historic Sites, Tennessee History

The ramparts we watched

It’s the bicentennial year of the Battle of Fort McHenry, and a few days ago I managed to do something the British couldn’t: take the fort by water.  I was in Baltimore for a few days, so I hopped on a Water Taxi to visit the birthplace of the national anthem.

I was very impressed by the exhibit in the visitor center. The NPS always does a fantastic job at interpretation, but the set-up at Ft. McHenry is especially good, a model of clarity and conciseness that covers the background to the War of 1812, the British attack on Baltimore, Francis Scott Key’s song, and the process by which his words became part of the American canon.  All that in a pretty small gallery space.

There’s also an immersive film presentation that tells the story of the battle, with a simple but nifty trick at the end that takes you out of the virtual environment of the theater to put the spotlight back on the historic ground and why it matters.  It’s very moving and pretty darned cool.

I’m assuming we all know the basic story here, so we’ll skip the exposition and get right to the pictures.  Here are the fort walls, with the flag flying overhead.  (Well, not the flag, but a flag.)

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A reconstructed battery.

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Inside the walls, some of the buildings have been furnished as they would have been in the nineteenth century, while others serve as galleries for additional exhibits.

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One of those bombs bursting in air we keep hearing so much about.

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Powder magazine.  Not the best place for a smoke break.

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Sleeping quarters.

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During an archaeological dig in the 1950s, workers uncovered the actual cross brace which anchored the flagpole for the original Star-Spangled Banner.  It’s on display in one of the buildings.

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Looking out toward the area from which the British attacked.

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Ft. McHenry was in use for a long time after the War of 1812 ended, so some of the features you see date from well after the famous defense against the British, like this massive piece of artillery.

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There were quite a few school groups there during my visit.  Here’s an interpreter leading some kids through a hands-on activity on the parade ground.

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Funny story:  One of the rooms inside the fort has a short movie with a map presentation of the campaign.  Right after I sat down to watch it, a couple of kids came in.  When the film ended with the British in retreat and the Americans still in possession of the city, one patriotic little guy behind me jumped up and exclaimed, “YESSSS!”  Good to know the place and the story are still capable of instilling some good old-fashioned American pride.

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Memorial Day weekend at Marble Springs

If you don’t have plans for Memorial Day weekend, then head over to John Sevier’s place.  May 25-26 is the annual Statehood Days Living History Weekend at Marble Springs State Historic Site in Knoxville.  They’re hosting militia drills, eighteenth-century demonstrations, a display of guns from the War of 1812, and a presentation on veterans of the Battle of King’s Mountain by yours truly.  (I think my talk is scheduled for 11:30 on Saturday.)

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Knoxville is getting a taste of the War of 1812

The Tennessee State Museum’s traveling exhibit on the War of 1812 is now at the East Tennessee Historical Society, and will be in Knoxville through May 19.  Looks pretty cool!

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Random stuff

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Take a tour of Kentucky’s War of 1812

The War of 1812 tour is now available on the Kentucky Historical Society’s Explore KY History app.  If you haven’t downloaded this thing, let me once again recommend it to you.  Most Americans probably associate the War of 1812 with the Chesapeake or the Gulf of Mexico, but Kentucky suffered more casualties in that conflict than all the other states combined.

Gov. Isaac Shelby as painted by Matthew Jouett, from the Kentucky Historical Society’s Hall of Governors via Wikimedia Commons

One of the most notable Kentucky vets was Isaac Shelby, who became the state’s first governor in 1792 and then ran for the same post twenty years later.  Shelby didn’t throw his hat into the ring until less than a month before the 1812 gubernatorial election, and he was more than sixty years old.

He won handily anyway, partly because he’d already made a name for himself during the Rev War and Kentuckians were gearing up for another confrontation with England. (Shelby had led a regiment at King’s Mountain; in fact, he was one of the primary architects of the expedition that defeated Ferguson’s Tories.)  In the summer of 1813 he took the field himself at the head of 3,500 volunteers who fought at the Battle of the Thames, thus seeing action in both of America’s wars with Britain.

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Time to call your congressman

The House of Representatives can now vote to allow the NPS to acquire important Revolutionary War and War of 1812 sites.  Drop a line to your representative and tell him or her to support the American Battlefield Protection Program Amendments Act (H.R. 2489).  It’ll only take you a few minutes.

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