Philbrick is tackling Bunker Hill

According to an item brought to our attention by J. L. Bell at Boston 1775, Nathaniel Philbrick is working on a book entitled Bunker Hill, a look at Boston from 1768 to 1775.

This sounds reminiscent of Philbrick’s Mayflower.  Rather than an examination of the Pilgrims’ actual voyage, it was a fairly straightforward narrative that began with the founding of Plymouth and ended with King Philip’s War.

Richard Ketchum wrote an accessible account of the battle and its background called Decisive Day, but I’m not aware of any full-dress, detailed tactical treatments.  Of course, as I’ve noted before, there are a lot of gaping holes in the historiography of the Revolution, but this one in particular is a little surprising.  Bunker Hill is one of the war’s better-known battles, and one that squares pretty well with some near-and-dear myths about the prowess of citizen soldiers.

2 Comments

Filed under American Revolution, Historiography

2 responses to “Philbrick is tackling Bunker Hill

  1. Frances Hunter

    This is great news. Philbrick’s Mayflower was a terrific idea, but a real writing challenge. There are certain stories that peak at the beginning, and the Mayflower is one of them. I thought the narrative was hard to sustain; there should be no such challenge with Bunker Hill. I’m glad to see the revival of interest in the Revolution.

  2. Michael Lynch

    I’m glad to see it, too. It’ll be interesting to see if he digs up any neglected sources. His Mayflower book had a pretty impressive list of literature that he’d consulted, even if he approached it as a straight narrative.

    –ML

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