A proclamation visitation

The honest-to-goodness original Emancipation Proclamation came to Nashville for a limited engagement, and since my cousin and I are dedicated history aficionados, we hit the road to see it.  I would’ve snapped a photo, but…

photo-9

Anyway, as an unexpected bonus, we got to see the Thirteenth Amendment, too.  The Tennessee State Museum hosted these items as part of a special Civil War exhibit from the National Archives, and even if you don’t see the proclamation itself, the exhibition is still worth a visit.  It uses NARA holdings to illustrate various subjects relating to the war, so you get a sense of the incredible variety and value of primary sources from the period as well as learning about the conflict itself.  Check out Gordon Belt’s blog for some photos.

This was one of the most rewarding public history experiences I’ve had in a long time.  Getting to see the proclamation was great, of course, but what I enjoyed almost as much was seeing the other visitors enjoy themselves.  People of every age and background were there; the TSM was open late to accommodate the crowds, and as we left, the line of ticket holders and standbys was as long as it had been when we entered.  While everyone waited to be admitted, the staff passed around handouts with transcriptions of the proclamation’s text, and visitors huddled in groups to read them, discussing particular passages and arguing over implications and meanings.

About these ads

1 Comment

Filed under Abraham Lincoln, Civil War

One response to “A proclamation visitation

  1. The Emancipation Proclamation was on view at the National Archives in DC at the beginning of January, and the lines to see it were ridiculous. Nice to see that so many people were interested. I didn’t see it, but I did see the first draft of the Emancipation Proclamation, in Lincoln’s hand, currently on exhibit at the Library of Congress. Seeing Lincoln’s handwriting was what really made it for me.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s