Down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

I’ve spent the whole War of 1812 Bicentennial waiting to post this. *squeals with delight*

Fun fact: Jimmy Driftwood, the guy who wrote this ditty, was actually an Arkansas schoolteacher and principal named James Corbitt Morris, who used music to liven up his history classes.  In 1936 he set his own lyrics to a traditional song about the battle called “The Eighth of January.”

Driftwood got a recording contract about twenty years later, but “The Battle of New Orleans” didn’t become a sensation until Johnny Horton heard it on the radio while driving home from a show and decided to do his own version.  Horton got a hit, Driftwood got a second career as a musician, and we got a song so awesome it almost makes up for the White House getting torched.

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2 Comments

Filed under Tennessee History

2 responses to “Down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

  1. I happened upon Jimmy Driftwood’s recording a few months ago, and I have to say I like that one better than the Johnny Horton tune I grew up with.

  2. Pingback: Thursday Night Concert: “The Battle of New Orleans” | Dead Confederates, A Civil War Era Blog

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