Twenty houses and ten observations

To be honest with you, I’m just burned out on this Civil War Sesquicentennial thing, so let’s set aside the obligatory Appomattox post, unwind a little, and take a look at this listicle of twenty historic houses to visit in Tennessee.  Here are my observations, for whatever they’re worth:

  1. The Carter Mansion is right there near the top.  Well done.  (I’m quite fond of the Carter Mansion, you know.)
  2. Blount Mansion made the list.  Good.
  3. No Marble Springs on the list.  Home of Tennessee’s first governor.  Put it on the list, already.
  4. Tipton-Haynes made the list, and it has a Sevier association.  This mitigates some of my vexation over the omission of Marble Springs.  Not all of it, but a little.  Actually, Sevier would probably be totally miffed to see Tipton’s home and Jackson’s home on the list when his own home is omitted.
  5. More eighteenth-century homes on the list than I expected, which is nice.
  6. No Andrew Johnson home on the list.  Homes of two other Tennessee presidents listed, but no Johnson.  What gives?
  7. Not one, not two, but three houses associated with the Battle of Franklin on the list.  That’s more than the number of John Bell Hood’s functional limbs.  Pick either the Carter House or Carnton, for crying out loud.
  8. Technically, I suppose Graceland is a historic home, but I think we all know it’s not a real historic home, right?  Judging by the supermarket tabloids, we can’t even be sure the guy who lived there is dead.
  9. The Lincoln quote at the top of the site is a worthy sentiment, but I doubt he actually said it.
  10. You know what could’ve replaced one of those Battle of Franklin houses?  Sgt. York’s home.  That would’ve been cool.
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1 Comment

Filed under Museums and Historic Sites, Tennessee History

One response to “Twenty houses and ten observations

  1. I’m always looking for visit ideas in states I haven’t visited yet. Thank you for the insights!

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