Tag Archives: Civil War navy

Craig Symonds talks about Lincoln and naval matters

…in an interview at the Lincoln Institute blog.  Check it out.

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Filed under Abraham Lincoln, Civil War

Admiral Farragut, both remembered and forgotten

Knoxville historian Jack Neely has written a fascinating article on the legacy of East Tennessee’s own Admiral David Farragut, with an update on the disappearing birthplace monument.

Wikimedia Commons

The current status of Farragut’s boyhood home and the marker that once stood there is…well, complicated.  Very, very complicated.

What I didn’t know before reading Neely’s piece is that Farragut has become a hero among Americans of Spanish-speaking descent.  His father was a native of Minorca who settled in the Knoxville area back when Tennessee was still the Southwest Territory.

Knoxville historians once assumed they were the only ones who’ve ever heard of George Farragut, the early settler. But there’s a high-quality portrait of him at the Smithsonian. He’s the one Knoxville settler of whom we have the clearest physical image: a robust fellow on the verge of a chuckle. Now he has his own Wikipedia page. George Farragut has emerged as a Spanish-American patriot of the Revolutionary War.

His son who became an admiral has also gained new attention. “I am extremely proud of sharing the same heritage as Admiral Farragut,” says Coral Getino, the Spanish-born leader of Knoxville’s HoLa Hora Latina, hosts of the popular annual festival. “Farragut is a role model for us: A first-generation Hispanic-American, hard-working family man, who earned the highest Navy rank for the first time in history,” she says. “His bravery, determination, and perseverance—in battle and in life—exemplify values we want to teach our children. He is a national hero who was born right here, almost in my neighborhood.” Learning the Farragut story, she says, helped inspire her to get involved in the Knoxville community.

Navy guys, Civil War buffs, and various other constituencies are also keenly interested in the fate of Farragut’s birthplace. A pity more people from the admiral’s own neck of the woods aren’t as concerned.  Neely notes that at the time of its dedication, the birthplace monument was probably the most prominent marker of its kind in the Knoxville area.  You wouldn’t expect a rock like that to fade from memory, but then you wouldn’t expect it to grow legs and walk away, either.

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Filed under Appalachian History, Civil War, Historic Preservation, Tennessee History

Would any of you good people happen to know

…where the heck the monument at Admiral David Farragut’s birthplace went?

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Filed under Civil War, Tennessee History

Civil War ship in inland Georgia

Here’s a nifty outdoor exhibit for you.  Last weekend the National Civil War Naval Museum in Columbus, Georgia unveiled a full-scale replica of the USS Water Witch, a blockader captured by a Confederate raiding party near Savannah in 1864.  The story of its capture is one heck of a tale—check out the account on the NCWNM’s website.  It’s like something out of a nineteenth-century version of Tom Clancy.

I didn’t know much about the museum until I ran across the Water Witch news story, but now that I’ve scoped out the exhibits online, I think I’m going to have to take a trip to Columbus.

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Filed under Civil War, Museums and Historic Sites