Tag Archives: Tennessee State Museum

We might actually be getting a new state museum

This is a legitimately big deal:

A plan years in the making for a new Tennessee State Museum next to Nashville’s Bicentennial Mall may finally get funding for construction.

Gov. Bill Haslam has proposed allocating $120 million for a new state museum as part of an amendment to his 2015-16 budget that includes nearly $300 million in additional non-recurring investments. To become a reality, the new museum would also require $40 million in private funds from the museum’s ongoing fundraising efforts.

The governor’s office says it is moving forward on the museum and other new capital projects because franchise and excise tax collections exceeded estimates last month as a result of “an unusual one-time event” on top of other revenue collections and program savings.

“I think all of the plans have been pretty well agreed to, and this could move along pretty quickly now that we have the funding in place,” Tennessee Finance and Administration Commissioner Larry Martin said of the museum.

It’s pretty exciting.  I just hope the new galleries will be as jam-packed with artifacts as the current exhibits in the Polk building.  The best thing about the current facility is the fact that you get to come face to face with so much awesome stuff.  It’s that encounter with so many incredible objects that makes a visit to the state museum so special: personal effects from the Donelson party’s harrowing flatboat voyage to Middle Tennessee, the Peale portrait of Sevier, and (of course) that exhibit case full of King’s Mountain treasures.

If the new galleries keep the collections at the forefront in the same manner as the current exhibits, while employing the latest techniques to interpret them, then we’re going to be in for a great show.

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A slave cemetery study and a TSM exhibit

Next year the Tennessee State Museum is mounting an exhibit on slavery at the Wessyngton plantation, which at one point was the largest farm in the entire state and the biggest tobacco-producing plantation in the country.  Archaeologists from UT have been studying the plantation’s slave cemetery, site of some 200 burials, as part of the preparation for the exhibit.  USA Today has the details.  Looks like it’ll be an interesting display.

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Want your own antebellum house?

If you do, and you’ve got a hefty wallet, there’s a nice one headed for the auction block in Lincoln County, TN.  And this one gets bonus points for a Rev War connection.  The occupant’s father was Joseph Greer, a King’s Mountain veteran who reportedly carried news of the battle to Philadelphia.  (His compass is on display at the Tennessee State Museum.)

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Volunteers at war

While my cousin and I were in Nashville last week to see the Emancipation Proclamation, we visited a collection I’d managed to miss on all my previous trips to Music City: the Tennessee State Museum’s Military Branch.


Jacket, cap, leg guards, medals, and dog tags belonging to Alvin C. York

Located inside the War Memorial Building near the Capitol, the Military Museum focuses on America’s wars from 1898 through 1945 and Tennesseans’ participation in them.  It’s a small facility, but it’s chock full of impressive artifacts.  Historical weapons and uniforms make up the bulk of the collection, but you’ll also find models, medals, propaganda posters, the silver service from a battleship, and a jacket worn by Dwight Eisenhower. Some of the items on display are trophies carried home by Tennessee veterans, such as Philippine and Japanese swords and German sidearms.

Although the exhibits give you a pretty general overview of America’s wars, special attention is paid to Tennessee connections.  A special highlight is a case devoted to Alvin York containing a uniform jacket, the Congressional Medal of Honor he received for his exceptional exploits of October 8, 1918, and some additional items.  (The museum is currently running a temporary exhibit on Sgt. York and the effort to map and excavate the site of his most famous engagement, so this is a great time to visit if you’re interested in WWI’s most famous soldier.)

The exhibits are a little dated, but the items on display more than make up for the lack of bells and whistles.  Give yourself about an hour and a half to tour the museum; hardcore weapon and military buffs will probably need additional time to take it all in.

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A proclamation visitation

The honest-to-goodness original Emancipation Proclamation came to Nashville for a limited engagement, and since my cousin and I are dedicated history aficionados, we hit the road to see it.  I would’ve snapped a photo, but…


Anyway, as an unexpected bonus, we got to see the Thirteenth Amendment, too.  The Tennessee State Museum hosted these items as part of a special Civil War exhibit from the National Archives, and even if you don’t see the proclamation itself, the exhibition is still worth a visit.  It uses NARA holdings to illustrate various subjects relating to the war, so you get a sense of the incredible variety and value of primary sources from the period as well as learning about the conflict itself.  Check out Gordon Belt’s blog for some photos.

This was one of the most rewarding public history experiences I’ve had in a long time.  Getting to see the proclamation was great, of course, but what I enjoyed almost as much was seeing the other visitors enjoy themselves.  People of every age and background were there; the TSM was open late to accommodate the crowds, and as we left, the line of ticket holders and standbys was as long as it had been when we entered.  While everyone waited to be admitted, the staff passed around handouts with transcriptions of the proclamation’s text, and visitors huddled in groups to read them, discussing particular passages and arguing over implications and meanings.

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  • If you’re within driving distance of Nashville, don’t forget about the special exhibition of the original Emancipation Proclamation at the Tennessee State Museum, Feb. 12-18.  Viewing hours are limited and lines may be long, so click here to learn how to make advance reservations.  Some time slots are already full.
  • Hey, speaking of Lincoln, did you know that in addition to leading a Marxist war effort, he was also an “unscrupulous fascist“?  A sneaky devil, that Lincoln.
  • Here’s an interesting history of the sites associated with Lincoln’s early life.
  • Thoughts from East Tennessee on the importance of family heirlooms.
  • There’s another proposed state law to prevent people from fiddling with or renaming monuments.  This one is right here in Tennessee.
  • Some info on the sesquicentennial commemoration of the Chattanooga Campaign.
  • Mt. Vernon has acquired an original painting by Benjamin Latrobe.

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Filed under Abraham Lincoln, Appalachian History, Civil War, History and Memory, Museums and Historic Sites, Tennessee History

Knoxville is getting a taste of the War of 1812

The Tennessee State Museum’s traveling exhibit on the War of 1812 is now at the East Tennessee Historical Society, and will be in Knoxville through May 19.  Looks pretty cool!

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